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taliban has stepped up its attacks in man's of next month's elections -- in advance of next month's elections. several people were killed outside a local party office outside the city of kohat. security has been increased in karachi after two secular parties were targeted overnight. thus get the latest from, hyder -- let's get the latest from hyder.yder -- kamal as you mentioned, two attacks today -- >> as you mentioned, two attacks today. of the attacksup that the taliban promised to the taliban spokesman telling the local part -- promised. the taliban spokesman telling the local media that -- they said that all the coalition partners of the outgoing government, that includes the pakistan people's party, the mood to heat up on the movement .- the muttahida qaumi movement they also attacked two independent candidates, saying that all secular-minded politicians who were taking part in this particular election would be a fair target. >. ka -- >> kamal, what does this stay -- say about the state of security in pakistan right now, particularly with the elections coming up? >> it is go
. >> so was it a failure of american policy. >> it was right for us to go in there to punish the taliban for providing safe haven to al qaeda. and it would have been right to have an anti-terrorist policy, a rather small one with a small military foot print. but when we got into the business of trying to fight a counterinsurgency war and change the country into a democracy, it was far more than we or any other nation had the capability to accomplish. >> was that our mission? >> yeah, but i think i disagree slightly. i think it had to be. because you know we were attacked on september 11th, the taliban was the state and we destroyed the state. we decapitated taliban. that i think left us with the obligation to build something, to build another state. and that's what we have been trying to do for the past 12 years. we've been trying to build the state. and so when you ask the question what are we leaving, what are we leaving behind, we're leaving behind a very ricketty jerry build state that, you know, i hope it lasts forever. but doesn't look very good right now. >> rose: so what are your
taliban is predicting even more bloodshed. two people killed in a party rally. islamabadreport from on the violent acts to disrupt it. was planted outside the campaign office in a northwest city. the target, an independent candidate running for election before the polls. people were killed, many others wounded in the attack. shortly afterwards, another bombing, also targeting an independent candidate, killing several and injuring many more. the taliban has claimed responsibility for both attacks. there were looking at three political parties, the national and thenother movement, ruling pakistan people's party. all three are perceived as secular and liberal. seems to be the the taliban are talking, to bring in any pakistan which is conservative, more religious. completely wiped out secularism. betweene distance liberals left of democracy in pakistan. >> the son of a violence follows a series of attacks in karachi one day earlier. the offices of two secular of buses were targeted in bombings, and another bombing took place near a shiite mosque. it has forced some to change their campa
against taliban to take control of their village. are the top stories from al jazeera. the indian supreme court has rejected a bid by a drug would says isent a new version of its drug. it will appeal the decision. al qaeda-linked rebels started attacking the city on sunday night. there has been fighting in another city as well. the new south korean president house promised a swift military response to any provocation from the north. north korea has been making almost daily threats to the u.s. and south korea. let's get more on our top story. that is the court decision in india to the night a patent to the drug maker. let's take a closer look at what is at stake in the pharmaceutical industry. it is estimated to be worth as much as $25 billion a year. it is clear why the company is seeking a patent. it is to prevent the drug from being copied. $1,800 will give you a month of treatment. that is 18 times more expensive than the generic version. that makes it a sensible to those who need it. for this reason, india has become a powerhouse in the pharmaceutical industry, exporting medicines to
about their role and you talked about how the talibye most significant issues the taliban will have to address. you still hold that view? to what extent does alp need to be funded and manned at all levels and is it a sustainable an initiative as we drawdown our coalition troops? >> i continue to believe the alp is critical to our success. it is an important component of our success. 21,000 of the alp today. the minister of interior has requested to grow that figure to 45,000. reviewasked my staff to that in june and july this year to insure that we don't look at the alp other than the full context of afghan security forces. i am a big believer in the acting local police initiative which is critical for security post-2014 and i believe it is sustainable. it has afghan ownership right now. the afghans are identifying the areas where they want alp to be established. >> i don't think you can overstate the utility of local ownership. let me know to the heavy responsibility you have and that is you preparing for this fighting season and you are planning for troop reductions. in your openi
, that fought, many gave their lives, they lost friends and family, fighting the taliban on our behalf, and now this administration has figured -- figuratively thrown them under the bus. friendship g to buy and peace, literally buy it with money, with the taliban. that's not how you deal with the taliban. their northern alliance knew how to deal with them. we helped them with some arms, we imbedded less than 500 special operations people in intelligence. and within three or four months, the northern alliance ad defeated the taliban. and then as i learned in my first meeting with northern alliance leaders some years ago , we told them, give us back the significant weapons we've given you, because we're america, we will make sure you're safe now, we'll make sure afghanistan is safe and peaceful now. so they turn in the weapons, they trusted the united states and now they find an administration that had reviously been offering to buy elegant international offices in qatar in the middle east, to give the taliban, who still want to kill americans and destroy our way of life, but to give them interna
in 2009, putting strict restrictions on they of air strikes, saying, even if you see a bunch of taliban running into a building, you can't call in an airstrike there because you don't know if there are women and children in that building. he recognized too many civilians were being killed through these actions. now, imagine if you're one of those guys on the patrol and you're getting shot at by the talibans who just fled over there. you want to do them in, and so it was real cultural shift and one that uses military in some cases grudgely, some case unevenly accepted. but even so, it's really hard to do what we need to do with the sort of military that we have and with a desire to really minimize casualties. i say all of this not tackling the bigger issue of whether we should have been in there in that scope and scale in the first place. >> host: what should we think about predator drones? >> guest: i was asked this question yesterday, and i am not going to have the sort of reflexive drones are evil answer here. particularly after seeing when you bring in a large conventional force, wha
trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines came into in 2009 and subsequently it has stabilized significantly since then. so the primary mission of marines in southwest afghanistan is security. but our secondary mission is to assist our interagency partners in kick starting institutions that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency par
uzbekistan. the taliban would have become the dominant force in the country. although probably not controlling all of it. the taliban remains today, allied with al qaeda, close links with al qaeda. al qaeda would have been able to reestablish itself. the united dates would not be doing drone strikes. it would not have any place to ace those assets. i think it is easy to say what would have happened in afghanistan if we had simply conducted our punitive attack on taliban. routed them, and then left the country. >> are those emissions we should be fighting back out -- fighting? >> one should not take for my talk and isolationist view. maybe we should be involved in this kind of things. what we should ask ourselves at the beginning is, what will the cost of military intervention be? what is the likelihood of success? and have an honest discussion of what it will cost and in so applying military force in the process of doing that, which produces actions, reactions, counter actions, will the process of using military force has been worth it in the first place when we talked about th
and installing a task force for the taliban regime. he helped establish the new afghan government and on september 16, 2001 he raised the flag over the newly reopened u.s. embassy. he helped on the stabilization and reconstruction of bosnia and the nato intervention in kosovo. our final speaker is an award- winning historian, associate professor of history and director of the military history program at west point. this article appeared in the world politics review first exposed the growing risk among military intellectuals about the growing -- u.s.'s conventional capabilities. ofwas among a small group dissident officers and defense analysts who questioned the necessity and efficacy of using counterinsurgency in afghanistan to destroy al qaeda. his forthcoming book draws on his experiences of the combat battalion commander in iraq. with that a turn at the podium over. >> thank you for that kind introduction. my apologies to all of you who might have come expecting a pointed debate between the cato analyst and the "washington post" editor. there are many points of agreement. what
to the taliban. so we left, ignored lesson two. in terms of establishing public security, the bush administration took the position that u.s. troops in afghanistan would do no peace keeping, and neither would anybody else. they allowed a small peacekeeping force to go into kabul because the afghans insisted on it. they refused the pleas both from karzai and from the u.n. to expand that peacekeeping force to the rest of the country, and they took the position that u.s. troops in the rest of the country would not do peacekeeping. the result was we turned security throughout a society of 70 million to the afghans, a society that had no army and no police force. so i think it's not remarkable that things deteriorated, that the taliban was able to reconstitute itself, to recruit, to refinance, to reorganize and to begin to project power to get pakistani sanctuaries back into afghanistan, and the united states responded in dribs and drabs over the years. we tend to say that this is the longest war we've ever fought. if you look at the major wars, it's also the least costly. in terms, certainly, in term
drive home to afghans and the taliban the success of the afghan security forces whose performance our commanders tell us have exceeded expectations. maintaining a steady pace of reductions would also send an important message to president karzai. the afghan president's use of anti coalition rhetoric, while serving some domestic political purpose, shows an insensitivity to the sacrifices made by our troops over the last decade and of aes a chill on the idea long-term partnership. it is in every one's interest to promptly set the conditions for any post-2014 partnership with afghanistan. nato defense ministers have already begun consideration of the size and mission for a post-2014 force in afghanistan. one factor that will influence that decision is the size and capacity of the afghan security forces. in this regard, the recent decision by nato defense ministers to support maintaining the afghan security forces at the current 352,000 than through 2018, rather reducing the support to a level of 230,000, as previously planned, is the right thing to do. it sends an important signal of our
is less relevant than the assessment of the taliban. the most feared organize out there right now is the afghan local police because the taliban realize they cannot make inroads there. it's the partnership between the organizations that much made this so effective. we've learned a lot about proper chain of command and ensuring that this oversight are fully plugged into, again, the minister of interior and we are implemented layered security in each one of the provinces. >> thank you very much, sir. thank you for your service. >> thank you very much senator reed. senator mccain? >> thank you, mr. chairman. welcome back, general. and first of all, in your written statement you have a "what winning looks like," and you have four bullet points. one says "an operationally ineffective al qaeda deprived of a safe haven from which to plan and conduct operations outside the area." have you seen any change there? >> over the years i have, senator. >> i they don't have a safe haven anymore in pakistan? >> they have a same haven inside of afghanistan in some areas, we're disrupting them but t
of local forces. areafghan local police trying hard to defeat the resurgent taliban fighters. forces began withdrawing combat troops across afghanistan, military commanders hope these men will become the first line of defense in the fight against the taliban after they have gone. at this shooting range, members of the afghan local police are taught marksmanship by afghanistan's special forces. >> we give them the best training. not only are these men willing to fight the taliban, they are ready to fight. >> stationed in rural villages around the country, the forces are made up of around 20 by a dozen officers. help intended to -- extend security and afghan influence to areas beyond the range of government or police and the honorable to taliban control. created by the u.s. and later incorporated into the afghan interior ministry, alp has a stringent testing process. security officials say the world police service is so effective it has become a top target for the taliban, but it is not without controversy. the u.n. mission to afghanistan says the accountability of local police varies from p
coalition forces present, to about 80% now. there are other signs of progress, as well. under taliban rule, roughly 1000 afghan children were at school and girls were denied education. now, more than 8 million students attend at against -- afghan schools and 40% are females. in 2001, afghan -- afghanistan had 20 teachers, all male. today, 200,000 teachers, including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access, compared to about 1 million in 2002. earlier this year, president obama announced plans for drawing down 34,000 of the 66,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan by february of 2014. this has been interpreted as meaning the bulk of the forthcoming u.s. troop reductions will be put off until the end of this year. for several reasons, it would be better to stick with the steady pace approach the president at one point said he contemplated for those. it would drive home to afghans and the taliban the success of the afghan security forces whose performance our commanders us have ex
bang cannot beat -- taliban cannot be the afghans. they do not have the numbers or ability. we still need to be there to advise and to help them. >> you do not be taliban, we have not been able to defeat them. taliban. defeating the that is not mean they would be able to set up a suicide bomber. i do not think it will be totally as peaceful as a washington, d.c. >> when you were there bombs went off. secretary chuck hagel was targeted. >> they killed seven people. >> in the middle of the capital. that will probably continue. they are not going to be able to come in and control the government. that is what i am talking about. they will not be able to gain control like they did so the terrorists could train and prepare for attack on us. >> you are confident in that. >> yes. have all the tools they need. if we do not stay there to back what it taliban is saying. this is so important to get rather than later. he come down to people, individual people. there are certain important things that need to be done and the to be in that agreement. in thatneed to be agreement. we could end up like
. they also met with a taliban representative in doha. the taliban has been allowed to set up a representative -- negotiating office in the city. >> for president karzai to talk to representatives of the leader of caliban is quite significant, is quiteliban significant, but the president of afghanistan needs to convince them to join the political process. he is concerned with the future if americans pullout by 2014. taliban he knows the are far from degefeated. he would like them to join the political process and talk about the way out. said thean -- taliban past several years that they do not recognize the government of karzai. at this critical moment, they have to make some major concessions for them to be able to move forward. the international community is not going to allow for a taliban office in qatar if the taliban are not genuinely willing to talk to the government of afghanistan about what to do after 2014. >> let's move straight onto the world of sport. >> thank you very much. wills -- andy murray become the new world number two when rankings come out. he won the miami masters a sec
policies created a vacuum that enabled the taliban to resurface. the second explanation for what went wrong is that president barack obama correctly shifted america's focus back to afghanistan but failed to fully resource the mission and wrongly fixed a date for ending combat involvement. although both answers have a great deal of merit, the project decreed a viable, seblized and legitimate afghan government may have been doomed from the very beginning. debates about the war in afghanistan often mirror debates about the war in iraq. we get wrapped up in procedural questions about planning and execution and we appeal the counterfactuals of if home we did this or that differently. but we rarely challenge the underlying assumption that we could have ever promoted national reconciliation, lasting peace or built a capable and popular government. in addition to what seems to be an unquestioned faith about our abilities in afghanistan, both the bush and obama administrations promoted the belief that establishing rule of law, building infrastructure, growing an economy, eliminating corruption and r
withdrawal of u.s. and nato. nic robertson getting an exclusive look inside a taliban training camp where raw recruits are being taught to fight and kill. >> reporter: this is not your normal taliban video. more misses than hits. troops struggling to master their weapons. >> i capture everything in this videos. condition of homes, sleeping. >> reporter: he is a pakistani journalist. out of concern for his safety, wants his identity kept secret. he tells me the pakistani taliban gave him rare access to one of their remote training camps close to afghanistan. where he saw them preparing for the nato pullout over the border. a battle he says taliban think they've won. >> they said, we have inflicted damages on them. that's why they are withdrawing from the region. they said that is our success that they are going from the region. >> reporter: he says he shot his video a year ago and for the week he was there, he followed four young pakistani suicide attack recruits. the training is detailed as it was long and relentless. everything from gun cleaning to rehearsing murder while driving in a car. h
of radicals. a few years ago, the taliban held sway here. we're in the valley, a few hours drive from pakistan's capital, and the army are taking us to see the next generation of jihadis. in this classroom, trained child suicide bombers and killers. boys as young as 8, all from poor families, all weaned on taliban propaganda, not about osama bin laden, but u.s. drone strikes. according to this school official, who also hides her face during taliban attack. >> they do drill into them a hatred against the americans. and the drones, they talk about the americans conducting the drone attacks and killing civilians. >> reporter: the drones operate out of u.s. bases in neighboring afghanistan. and according to the white house target, al qaeda and taliban, hiding in pakistan's tribal border region, not civilians. khan, who is from that tribal region, tells me his brother and son were killed in a drone strike in late 2009. >> they were not involved in any terrorist acts. >> reporter: he's suing the cia but given the chance, he says, he would take revenge on those responsible. >> i will kill them. if i
the status of forces there so they can provide enough security. the taliban can't beat the afghans. they don't have the numbers, they don't have the ability, with the great progress in training the afghan military but we need to be there and advise. >> you don't think the taliban -- we haven't been able to defeat the taliban. why do you think the government could with us gone? >> i think with we are defeating the taliban. that doesn't mean they're not going to be able to set off a suicide bomber. i don't think it's going to be totally as peaceful as, say, washington, d.c. >> when you were there, i mean, secretary hagel was targeted. >> right. well, i don't know -- >> during his visit. >> of that half a mile from where they were, and they killed seven people? >> the middle of the capitol. >> and i think that that will probably continue. but they're not going to be able to come in and control the government. that's what i'm talking about. they're not going to be able to gain control like they did, so that those terrorists that train and prepare for attack on us, not like 9/11. >> you're positi
left at least 50 people dead and almost 100 injured. >> at least nine taliban suicide bombers attacked a government complex that included a court room in the west of the country where some of their comrades were on trial. >> the bombing took place, as we heard, in the capital of the province that borders iran. >> it took afghan forces several hours to kill the last of the insurgents in the compound. officials say the attackers wore army uniforms and arrive at an army vehicles. after two of them detonated suicide vests, the others occupied several buildings, including a court room, where a hearing for a group of taliban prisoners was being held. all of the attackers were killed and none of the prisoners escaped. about 100 people were reported wounded, including at least a dozen soldiers, but most of the casualties were civilians. the province has seen an increase in taliban attacks in recent months, including several that targeted the local government. >> north korea has blocked access to a key joint industrial zone with south korea. this is a sharp escalation in the crisis. south korea
are girls. the taliban insurgency has made the situation even worse. as malala has set and reminded us, we live in the 21st century. how can we be deprived from education? she went on to say, i have the right to play. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to go to market. i have the right to speak out. how many of us here today would have that kind of courage? the taliban recognized this young girl, 14 at the time, as a serious threat. and you know what? they were right. she was a threat. [applause] extremism thrives amid ignorance and anger, intimidation and cowardice. as malala said, if this new generation is not given pens, they will be given guns. but the taliban miscalculated. they thought if they silenced her, and thank god they didn't, that not only she but her cause would die. but instead, they inspired millions of pakistanis to finally say enough is enough. you heard it directly from those two brave young pakistani women yesterday, and they are not alone. people marched in the streets. they signed petitions demanding that every pakistani child, boys
foriegners travelling through afghanistan via helicopter have been abducted by taliban insurgents. this after the helicopter they were travelling was forced to land in the azra district in logar province. that district is known to be controlled by the taliban. and according to b-b-c the taliban say they have the group. at this time it is not known why the helicopter came down. but the united nations says the aircraft is not one of theirs. china reports there's been another bird flu death. which now raises the death toll to at least 18. that word -- from the official xinhua news agency. state media also reported several new infections related to the h-7-n-9 virus. health officials have raised concerns about the source of the virus - since many patients had no contact with poultry. but the world health organization still says there's no evidence of transmission between people. >> coming up after the break. the sharks playing against the columbus blue jackets have a chance to clinch their ninth-straight postseason birth. but could they get it done? the answer coming up next. kron 4 news is rolli
that the city mismanaged the cleanup after the attacks. >> the taliban announced plans to launch a new spring offensive in afghanistan starting this weekend and today a nato plane crashed killing four people. in an interview with the associated press a taliban spokesman said the group is planning suicide attacks on foreign military bases and diplomatic areas and more insider attacks on u.s. and coalition forces. the move is in an effort to gain power ahead of next year's presidential election and the planned withdrawal of most u.s. and nato troops. forces are planning to hand over the role to afghan soldiers this spring. >> the afghan people should not fear the taliban threat. the security forces use the winter months to prepare for the handover of the lead of security in afghanistan by mid 2013, clearly they are ready. >> despite that april has been the deadliest month so far this year in afghanistan. 478 people have been killed this month, 40% of them were insurgents or rebels. >> good news for air travels, the sequester caused flight delays are about to end. the federal aviation administra
. >> >> in cutter, afghan president made with the gulf state leaders to discuss possible plans for a taliban office the united nations welcomed the president's efforts to move it forward. he insisted is he would only start with the taliban if they break all links with al-qaida an give up violence. the taliban called it a muppet regime of the u.s. lead nation. >> >> 10 people are dead after flash flooding this weekend. there are concerns that more rain could be on the way. many of the deaths happened yesterday when the victims were trapped. the prime minister said almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. >> >> hundreds of people woke up early this morning for a san francisco easter tradition. bag pipers opened the 91st annual sunrise service at mount davidson cross. that cross is one of the world's tallest at 103 feet. people there said they love this service, but got something different for the easter location. >> the location is an awesome spot. beautiful point to see the view of the city at these hours where a lot of people don't get to s
back here at home. we'll tell you why. >>> plus, exclusive video from inside a taliban training camp. stay with us for a rare look. hey. they're coming. yeah. british. later. sorry. ok...four words... scarecrow in the wind... a baboon... monkey? hot stew saturday!? ronny: hey jimmy, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? jimmy: happier than paul revere with a cell phone. ronny: why not? anncr: get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. only hertz gives you a carfirmation. hey, this is challenger. i'll be waiting for you in stall 5. it confirms your reservation and the location your car is in, the moment you land. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums before i do any projects you on on my own.st at angie's list, you'll find reviews written by people just like you. i love my
an 8-year-old child. the pal ban has now de -- taliban denied any role in the explosions. police department and security are stepping up their patrols. map linda so is lives security could be affecting fans? >> reporter: you can see expect to see more security, not only here at the ballpark but also throughout the city, and at light rail. police commissioner has ordered heightened scute throughout the -- security throughout the city. you can expect to see more security in the parking lot around the stadium, in wake of the boston bombings. signal 88, advice on what to do if something like that were to happen. be prepareds before a large events coordinate with family and friends a specific meeting location and scout out a place to find cough, follow directions. go with a crowd and not against it. create a hat of scanning the area -- create a habit of scanning the area. expect to see security throughout the city starting today. the orioles hosting a 9-game home stretch. expect to see the security here at the ballpark as well. >>> new york city immediately increased security followin
, steely malala, who had not even been born when hillary spoke in somalia. how dare the taliban and take away my basic right to education? hillary rodham clinton spoke truth to power, but she did not leave it that. she has worked to recast the conversation in both work and deed. so often she was working unseen, and private, individual groups of women in the world's most challenging places. she strode into the senate, the ultimate old boys' club -- one of the finest minds of the 12th century. as america secretary of state, she made women's rights and therefore human rights a central focus. not an afterthought, not a sidebar -- central. she issued directive to all embassies of the strategic imperative of advancing women's equality. she said it so well in 2011, when we liberate the economic potential of women, we elevate the economic performance of nations and the world. definitively refrained at the whole conversation about the advancement of women. first establish that women's rights are human rights, then explain that unshackling women is just good business. the big question about hillar
. this woman, afghan woman, she was a soldier against the taliban. this is one of the picturesment we have other pictures using an ak-47. i said, i believe you. but how many times we heard afghan women being sold -- fighting next to their hoveses against the taliban. these stories exist, and if we minimize them into only very victim's story, we're violating them again, and that's why perspective if you knew me, you would know i'm trying to lose weight in here and this woman is a teacher and is gettingmer masters degree. her mother is a widow and a single woman who talks about crossing rivers and crossing over dead bodies just to save her two daughters, and help them go to school. she is a teacher right now and she is trying to lose weight, struggling with eating right, and bread every single night, which is not go. this is a universal this. don't eat bread. but the point is, if we connect -- if you connect to temple just like any of us in here, then and only then maybe we can build serious bridges of peace based on conversations a woman to a woman, a person to a person, as opposed to the v
remember malala? the pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the taliban for going to school? now she's joining forces with angelina jolie. >>> and this 3-year-old wasn't as impressed by a kiss. this is prince william. >> not so fast, your highness. rk your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. what's the "new" in the new new york?. a new property tax cap... and the lowest middle class income tax rate in 60 years... and a billion dollars in tax breaks and incentives. new opportunities for business. over 250,000 new private sector jobs were created over the last two years. and 17 straight months of job growth. with the most private sector jobs ever. lower taxes, new incentives, new jobs, now that's news. to grow or start your business in the
should also say there's news from pakistan this morning with the taliban. what's the taliban saying about this right now? >> exactly right. you know, this is the other thing we're going to going to look at. the pakistani taliban is claiming they didn't do t. let me read you a brief part of the statement that they put out. quote, wherever we find americans we will kill them, but we don't have any connection with the boston explosions. that coming from the ttp, the so-called pakistani taliban. what's so interesting about this is this group claims responsibility for the failed 2010 failed times square attack. there will be -- obviously we think, you know, claims of responsibility, claims that, no, we didn't do it, they're going to look at all of that to see what it tells them. and they will scour, as susan just pointed out, this he will scour everything they have for home grown perpetrators, but they will look at everything overseas as well. >> reporter: you know, as you said, barbara, one of the defining things right now about this investigation, there are no claims of responsibility. fasci
, completely lawless place run by war lords and mostly run by the taliban who are our morality enemies. taliban gave sanctuary and place of comfort and base of operations to al qaeda which is definitely our enemy. routed al qaeda to the extinct we could. taliban taken from power. and the situation there at least as far as our interests are concerned are better now than it was then. good place? make it switzerland? no does it make it better? is that not part of what the cia's co-verdict operations do? i think the answer may be yet. >> bill: i'm not sure. the french ambassador to afghanistan recently left to take over the french secret service and his parting remarks he said number one, they are all gangsters, he said exactly what i'm saying and they are all involved in the heroin trade which is killing more people than terrorism in europe right now which is true. and number two, as soon as the money stops, the united states bribe money, the millions of dollars we are giving them, these guys are going to take off. they are not going to hang there. the taliban will come waltzing back in. you know
's energies to iraq. his policies created a vacuum that enabled the taliban to resurface. the second explay mages for what went wrong is barack obama shifted america's focus back to america, but failed to fully resource the mission and wrong by -- wrongly fix the date for ending conflict involve. the answers have a great deal of merit. the project to create a viable, centralized, afghan government may have been doomed to fail from the very beginning. the base about the war in afghanistan was the war in iraq, wrapped up in procedural questions in planning and execution and appeal to counterfactuals if only we did this differently or that differently, but we rarely challenges underlying assumption we could have ever promoted national reconciliation, lasting peace, or built a capable and popular government. in addition to what seems to be an unquestioned faith about abilities in afghanistan, both the bush and obama administrations promoted beliefs that establishing rule of law, building infrastructure, growing an economy, eliminating corruption, and resolves disputes would somehow prevent anot
forces anticipate to be somewhere around 350,000. what are the estimates of the size of the taliban or al qaeda or the aggregate and in the group, if you will? >> that is a question we ask all the time and we do not know. there are some estimates that talk about 20,000 to 30,000 taliban. because you have various levels of taliban, those who are ideologically committed, the taliban senior leadership, certainly different than they today people who might fight on the ground, very different to capture a number when you talk about the cap -- the taliban. >> given the small number, the view of people at large will be critical as to whether or not they can gain any power in the situation. the will have to have support of the public. do you agree? >> what gives me optimism and the reason i am optimistic about the campaign is it is all about the afghan security force possibility to provide security to the population. we are improving in the particular area every day. it reduces the ability for the taliban to influence the possible -- the population. i think the taliban will wake up and realize the
that progress. they are taking the fight to the taliban on their own and plans to end the presence there by 2014 or on track. networking of terrorist criminal pursuit a nuclear weapons capability. those directly threat, our national security in the world well being. it is not fully developed to identify and disrupt such networking particularly regard to facilitation and financing mechanism. our witnesses this morning hold vital positions in helping us assist, understand, and counter these and other threats. we are grateful for your service, your advise as we consider the president's budget request. before i ask senator inhofe for his remarks. a closed session will be held following the open portion of this hearing, if necessary. >> thank you, mr. chairman. one of the reasons my opening remarks are always shorter is because i cross off things that you've already said in that dramaically shortens. i'm in agreement with your comments, mr. chairman. thank you to our witness for being here. it comes as a time when the nation's security is being challenged like never before. i might add that central
walk normally. of cirio's conflict. taliban militants have attacked accordant in the west of afghanistan was serious -- with suicide bombs and guns. 15 people were killed. the attackers tried and failed to free taliban subjects being transferred to the court for trial. scientists found a tantalizing hints of dark matter, a substance thought to make up a quarter of our universe. the results came from the most expensive scientific instrument ever to be put into space. now here is our science editor. >> a stunning sights of the northern lights. bombarded bye particles of space. one of the mysteries is what is out there. the universe as we see it is not all that is there. to understand the strange substance, the most expensive space instrument has been fitted to the space station. whatms has just picked up could be the first signs of dark matter. the first results were announced today. the findings are not definitive, but they provide important clues. for years, scientists have struggled with the strange fact but what we see in space is not a whole story. what is visible is on
the key to success is reconciliation between the afghan government and the taliban. >> reconciliation is the best provide the surest end to violence and to secure a unified and sovereign afghanistan. >> , the obama administration has insisted that reconciliation must be afghan-led. but pakistan has aided the taliban and provided them safe haven in the past. while the u.s. is pushing all parties to start negotiating now, pakistan has accused the afghan president hamid karzai, of being "an impediment to the peace process."analysts say all this makes the process of reconciliation that much harder. the problem is how to cobble together a government that has all of their stakeholders buying in. many of these countries for decades have very different geopolitical interests when it comes to afghanistan. >> as officials praised the progress of the afghan forces, the u.s. military concedes that the afghan air force will not be ready to take over air operations until at least the end of 2016. of considerable assistance coalition partners will still be needed. >> it will take time, the afghan ai
were rigged to the device. no one has claimed responsibility but the pakistani taliban threatened to killed musharraf shortly before he returned from self-imposed exile last year. in the southwestern city of quetta, a suicide bomb attack killed at least four people on same day. the blast occurred shortly after a prominent ethnic minority leader finished his campaign arrest. attack injured dozens. >> translator: make them stop these terrorists. young people have died in this attack. >> reuters says a spokesperson for a militant group dedicated to attacking pakistan's shiite muslim minority has claimed responsibility. meanwhile, the ap reports that two people were killed and several others wounded in a blast in karachi. an explosive device hidden in a motorcycle is to blame. so far this year, at least 200 have died in attack in pakistan mainly targeting shiite muslims. the government is now under pressure to ensure public safety during the campaign season and the upcoming elections on may 11th. >>> a weaker yen is making japanese firms more optimistic about their earnings. canon is
much. the taliban announced plans to launch a new offensive in afghanistan starting this weekend. in an interview with the associated press, the taliban spokesperson said the group is planning suicide attacks on foreigners and diplomatic areas, as well. tomorrow's launch is timed to coincide of the national holiday marking the soviet overthrow of the government. nato is planning to hand over afghanistan to the leading security. >> the afghanistan security forces view the winter months widely to provide for the hand-over of the security in fashion by 2013. clearly they are ready. >> despite that, april has been the worst month this year in afghanistan. >>> a soldier wounded in afghanistan almost two years ago is about to make his new home in hollister, thanks to the support from the community. more on today's celebration. >> reporter: sirens and a pause to welcome a hero returning from war. severely wounded, the sergeant arrived to a huge crowd on saturday. city residents, fellow vets, and even a former american idol contestant were there to honor his service and break ground on t
. >> absolutely. tracie potts, thank you so much. >>> the taliban is making good on its threats. insurgents in afghanistan kicking off their spring offensive on sunday, killing a police chief and two other officers. in past years, spring has marked a significant upsurge in fighting between the taliban and nato forces along with their local allies. it's also a key test of the international coalition is scheduled to hand over security responsibilities to afghan forces next year. meanwhile, a new report exposing tens of millions in so-called ghost money that's flowed from the cia to the offices of afghanistan's president, hamid karzai. according to "the new york times," the secret bags of money are dropped off every month to buy influence. but there's little evidence it has worked. instead, some u.s. officials saying the money has fueled corruption and empowered warlords undermining washington's exit strategy from afghanistan. >>> there's a taped phone conversation of boston's bomber suspect tamerlan tsarnaev that includes talk of jihad. russian intelligence intercepting the 2011 call with his
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